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Should I use 3/16″ or 5/16″ tubing? One of the first questions maple producers face when deciding to tube (or retube) a sugarbush is whether to use 3/16″ or 5/16″ tubing. This article explains some of the general rules that can be helpful in narrowing down the pros and cons of each approach.

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How long can I store sap? Sap is a highly perishable product. This article explains what happens as it is stored, and how to avoid problems.

Ask Proctor: Defoamer

We regularly get questions from maple producers about which defoamers are the best to use. Of course, the answer is…it depends.

Assessment of the Flavor of Syrup Produced with High-Brix RO Systems

Concentrating sap with reverse osmosis (RO) substantially increases the efficiency and profitability of processing maple sap into syrup by reducing the amount of fuel and time required to complete concentration to syrup density in the evaporator, with gains proportional to the level of sap pre-concentration. Because most flavor development in maple syrup occurs through nonenzymatic browning reactions as sap is processed with heat in the evaporator, it has often been speculated that reduced evaporator processing time resulting from the use of RO might also result in perceptible impacts on syrup flavor. However, a series of controlled experiments conducted at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center using the same sap processed to different levels with RO determined that concentrating sap up to 21.5% prior to boiling in standard maple evaporators had no substantive effects on syrup composition or flavor.

Birch can help increase your maple operation profits

Birch syrup production uses the same equipment as maple syrup production, and the spring sapflow season begins just as the maple season is ending. Sugarmakers might want to consider adding birch production to their operations to generate additional revenue.

Check-valve spouts vs. standard clear spouts

Leader Evaporator Co. Check-Valve (CV) spouts and adapters incorporate a small, free-floating ball which is designed to reduce or prevent backflow of sap into the taphole during freezing, when leaks in the tubing system occurs, and when mechanical releasers dump and introduce air into the system. Several studies over nearly a decade have compared sap yields from CV adapters and spouts to various non-CV spouts and adapters.

Chemical composition of five standard grades of pure maple syrup

The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of the five maple syrup grades, including their pH, conductivity, mineral and carbohydrate contents. In general, quantification of the range of chemical composition for each standard maple syrup grade will strengthen the existing knowledge of maple syrup chemistry.

Chemical Composition of Scale in Maple Syrup Evaporators

The goal of this work was to investigate the chemical composition of the scale that is deposited on maple evaporator surfaces during sap processing. Knowing the chemical composition of scale produced in modern equipment and how it compares to previously published values for loose sugar sand may aid in understanding how best to remove these unwanted deposits.