Showing 51 – 60 of 98 matching resources

Maple water: A first look

As the maple water industry has grown, this study conducted a taste test of various brands of commonly available maple waters.

Measuring Sap Flow

Keeping track of the amount of sap being collected is important for maintaining high yields and minimizing losses. This article explains how to measure sap using counters mounted on releasers.

Metabolism Off-Flavor In Maple Syrup – Part I: Identification of the compound responsible for metabolism off-flavor

Research on metabolism off-flavor in maple syrup at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research and Extension Center (PMREC) had two main objectives. The first was to identify the primary compound(s) responsible for metabolism off-flavor in maple syrup. Once the responsible compound or compounds were identified, measures to reduce or remove the off-flavor from finished maple syrup could be investigated. Thus, the second main objective was to determine whether a technique could be found that maple producers and packers might employ to effectively remediate the flavor, and thereby increase the economic value, of metabolized maple syrup.

North American Maple Syrup Producers Manual

A must have for any serious producer. One of the best books out there that cover all aspects of maple. This book has chapters on History of Maple Syrup and Sugar Production, Maple Resource, Planning an Operation, Managing Maple Trees, Sap Production, Syrup Production, Syrup Filtration, Marketing and many more. With over 300 pages this book is full of wisdom.

Off-flavors in maple syrup: metabolism

One of the many off-flavors that can be found in maple syrup is metabolism, often compared to the taste of wet cardboard or ‘woody.’ This article explains metabolism and how to identify it.

Proctor Maple Research Center Update: Investigating the Effects of Sap Processing Equipment and Techniques on Maple Syrup Chemistry & Quality

A new research facility designed and dedicated to the study of the effects of sap processing equipment and techniques on the chemistry and quality of maple syrup is being constructed at the UVM Proctor Maple Research Center. This facility will allow researchers to evaluate the differences in maple syrup due to changes in sap processing equipment, including reverse osmosis, evaporators, and other evaporation equipment (steam-away, air injection units, etc.).