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Filtering syrup in small batches is a huge pain. Any advice on how to make it easier?

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What causes syrup to be light or dark at different parts of the season?

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Q1: I’m considering switching from a flat pan to a larger pan with continuous flow, and keep hearing about the gradient. What is a gradient and why is it important? Q2: After a warm spell that made the sap stop running, a hard freeze made it start again so I collected and boiled. The syrup had an off-flavor. Why?

Ask Proctor: Defoamer

We regularly get questions from maple producers about which defoamers are the best to use. Of course, the answer is…it depends.

Assessment of the Flavor of Syrup Produced with High-Brix RO Systems

Concentrating sap with reverse osmosis (RO) substantially increases the efficiency and profitability of processing maple sap into syrup by reducing the amount of fuel and time required to complete concentration to syrup density in the evaporator, with gains proportional to the level of sap pre-concentration. Because most flavor development in maple syrup occurs through nonenzymatic browning reactions as sap is processed with heat in the evaporator, it has often been speculated that reduced evaporator processing time resulting from the use of RO might also result in perceptible impacts on syrup flavor. However, a series of controlled experiments conducted at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center using the same sap processed to different levels with RO determined that concentrating sap up to 21.5% prior to boiling in standard maple evaporators had no substantive effects on syrup composition or flavor.

Avoiding equipment trouble

Common problems with sugaring equipment and how to avoid them.

Beginner Notebook 1st Edition

Manual with chapters on setting up sap collection systems, sugarhouse management, selling maple products, finances, and more.

Bigleaf Maple Syrup: Nontimber Forest Products For Small Woodland Owners

The sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum) is most commonly used in maple sugaring, but all maples produce sap that can be converted to maple syrup. Though not as high in sugar content as the sugar maple, the sap of bigleaf maple trees (Acer macrophyllum) grown in the Pacific Northwest produces excellent syrup.

Bigleaf Maple Syrup: Nontimber Forest Products For Small Woodland Owners

The sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum) is most commonly used in maple sugaring, but all maples produce sap that can be converted to maple syrup. Though not as high in sugar content as the sugar maple, the sap of bigleaf maple trees (Acer macrophyllum) grown in the Pacific Northwest produces excellent syrup.