Showing 1 – 10 of 18 resources

Some quick tips to achieve higher sap yield

Increasing the yield of sap from maple trees is the goal of most maple producers. While getting there isn’t a matter of one simple thing, by
following best management practices and paying attention to detail it is possible to increase sap yields, often quite dramatically. Includes links to videos.

The Effect of Vacuum on Walnut Sap Flow

Our objective in this 2020 study was to revisit walnut tree sap flow and to determine whether vacuum applied to sap collection lines would substantially increase the production of walnut sap. Along the way, we made some somewhat startling and troublesome observations and formulated a next generation of questions that need to be answered to allow a viable walnut syrup industry to develop.

A Summary of Research to Improve Vacuum in Maple Tubing Systems

Research conducted at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center over several years to explore a variety of methods to potentially increase sap yields from tubing systems through modifications of the lateral/dropline portion of the sap collection system.

Growth Rates of Sugar Maple Trees Tapped for Maple Syrup Production Using High-Yield Sap Collection Practices

The amount of sap that can be extracted annually from trees for maple syrup production using current equipment and practices is more than double the typical yields achievable when current maple industry tapping guidelines were developed. The growth rates of trees tapped with these Òhigh-yieldÓ practices at 18 sites in Vermont were measured and evaluated to determine whether they were sufficient for the replenishment of conductive wood to remain at sustainable levels when current tapping guidelines are followed.

2015 3/16″ Maple Tubing Cooperator Trial

During the 2015 maple sap season the Cornell Maple Program conducted a small trial, testing sap yield from 5/16″ tubing vs. 3/16″ tubing. This trial was not conducted at the Arnot Research forest but with a small maple operation cooperator. The tubing system consisted of six lateral lines, three 5/16″ and three 3/16″ alternating between the two treatments across the hillside.

The 3/16 phenomenon

Using smaller-diameter tubing can create a natural vacuum which can increase sap production. This article details some research into this method of sap collection, and offers tips on some practical applications.