Showing 1 – 8 of 8 resources

Handbook for Maple Grading and Judging Training

Knowledge about grading and judging pure maple syrup is critical to supporting an industry that prides itself on exceptional quality and value.ÊThe purpose of this resource is to enable anyone to understand how to enter and judge the quality of maple syrup and maple products. Includes videos and worksheets.

Maple Food Safety Plans

Creating a food safety plan can help you maintain high-quality production and can help you when training new employees. This model food safety plan for maple is based on the recommendations made in the U.S. Food and Drug AdministrationÕs Guide to Minimize Microbial Food Safety Hazards for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (PDF), on the 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act and on industry recognized food safety practices.

Indicator Species, Fact Sheets: Red Maple, Acer rubrum

Red Maple is a deciduous tree that can be 50 to 60 feet tall at maturity. It is wide ranging, and native throughout the eastern half of the United States. Red maple can be used for syrup production. However, it tends to bud and flower very early in the season, which has a negative effect on the sap, making the syrup season for the red maple very short.

Indicator Species, Fact Sheets: Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum

Sugar maple is a deciduous tree that can grow to a height of 50 to 130 feet. It is native to the US, and found throughout the eastern states. Sugar maple is the primary source for maple sugar and syrup. Trees are tapped for syrup in late winter/early spring throughout New England. Sugar maple is also a valuable hardwood for a variety of products from flooring to cabinets.

When do I Tap a Maple Tree?

University of Maine Cooperative Extension educator Kathy Hopkins discusses the best time of year to tap maple trees in Maine.

How do I Tap a Maple Tree?

University of Maine Cooperative Extension educator Kathy Hopkins discusses the best method to safely tap a maple tree.