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2011 Update of Maple Tubing and Taphole Sanitation Research at Cornell

During the 2011 maple sap season a variety of research trials were conducted at the Arnot Forest of Cornell University and in the woods of a number of cooperators both with vacuum and gravity systems. Research conducted over the last five years has shown that significant increases in sap yield can be obtained by keeping the tap hole from contamination by bacteria and yeast.

A New Method for Pricing Sap

While you may think that sap pricing should be relatively simple and easy to understand, there are actually many factors that can and should affect sap prices. This article presents a new method for pricing sap and explains how it differs from the traditional pricing guidelines that have been posted annually in the Digest.

Asian Longhorned Beetle and its Host Trees

This pictorial guide provides basic information for identifying the Asian longhorned beetle, its injury characteristics, and its common host trees. The guide will help users detect the beetle in both urban and forested settings.

Beginning or Expanding Maple Syrup Operations as a Profitable Business!

The primary use for this guide is to assist maple operations in developing a basic plan used to secure funding for start-up, expansion, and operating loans as well as a basic framework to begin considering the income and expenses incurred as the operation develops.

Calculating costs for a maple tubing system

An important part of beginning or improving the tubing system in a maple enterprise is to have a good estimate of just how much the project will cost. Though there are many variables in installing a new or replacing an old system the cost of materials is predictable. Two factors allow you to make a reasonable estimate of what a sap collection system will cost in materials. The first is the number of taps per acre. The second is the density of trees.

Chemical Composition of Scale in Maple Syrup Evaporators

The goal of this work was to investigate the chemical composition of the scale that is deposited on maple evaporator surfaces during sap processing. Knowing the chemical composition of scale produced in modern equipment and how it compares to previously published values for loose sugar sand may aid in understanding how best to remove these unwanted deposits.