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High Brix Syrup Processing & First Two Seasons with Lapierre HyperBrix

Given our extensive research experience on RO processing and flavor, and the appearance of new RO technology that could concentrate to higher levels, a shift toward this new technology seemed appropriate. Therefore after investigating various options, we entered into a partnership with Lapierre Equipment to utilize the new HyperBrix RO system at UVM PMRC. This paper describes some aspects of our first two seasons of use of this equipment. Given the state of the industry, we define Òhigh brixÓ maple sap processing as RO machines capable of producing concentrate at 30¡Brix or higher.

Hitting the Slope

Analysis of the importance of slope on a variety of tubing systems.

Identifying Sustainable Practices for Tapping and Sap Collection from Birch Trees: Optimum Timing of Tapping Initiation and the Volume of Nonconductive Wood Associated with Taphole Wounds

Experiments were conducted to determine two pieces of information essential to identify practices necessary to ensure tapping trees for birch sap collection is both sustainable and profitableÑthe selection of the time to initiate tapping birch trees to obtain maximum yields, and the volume of nonconductive wood (NCW) associated with taphole wounds in birch trees. The yields obtained from various timing treatments varied between sapflow seasons, but indicate that using test tapholes to choose the appropriate time to initiate tapping is likely to result in optimum yields from birch trees. The volume of NCW associated with taphole wounds in birch trees was highly variable and generally quite large, averaging 220 times the volume of the taphole drilled, and requiring relatively high radial growth rates to maintain NCW at sustainable levels over the long-term. However, more conservative tapping practices, including reduced taphole depth and increased dropline length, as well as thinning and other stand management practices, can be used to reduce the minimum growth rates required. Producers can use this information to ensure that they use tapping practices that will result in sustainable outcomes and obtain the maximum possible sap yields from their trees.

Making Cornell Maple Syrup

In the Spring, maple trees begin to move sap up from their roots. At the Arnot forest, this sap is collected and then boiled down to produce maple syrup. In this video, Prof. Brian Chabot, tells us about the process and we see how maple syrup is made.

Maple Food Safety Plans

Creating a food safety plan can help you maintain high-quality production and can help you when training new employees. This model food safety plan for maple is based on the recommendations made in the U.S. Food and Drug AdministrationÕs Guide to Minimize Microbial Food Safety Hazards for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (PDF), on the 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act and on industry recognized food safety practices.

Maple Industry Panel

Where is the maple industry headed? Where are bulk prices headed? Is the global market demand for syrup keeping pace with the expansion in production? This panel discussion includes Bruce Bascom (Bascom Maple Farms), John Kingson (Butternut Mountain Farm), David Hall (Quebec Federation of Maple Producers) and Mark Cannella (UVM Extension Farm Business Specialist). The session is moderated by Mark Isselhardt (UVM Extension Maple Specialist)