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Reverse Osmosis for Maple Syrup Option 2

Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs reviews a second reverse osmosis system for a small-scale maple syrup producer. Reverse osmosis greatly reduces the time and energy spent in boiling maple syrup by pulling much of the water from the sap before the boiling process begins. Sap can be put through the system repeatedly and becomes more concentrated with each pass through the RO membrane. Boiling the concentrated sap at the end is always necessary however, as that greatly contributes to maple syrup’s rich flavor.

Small-scale Reverse Osmosis

Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs looks at a small-scale reverse osmosis unit and goes through the equipment piece by piece.

Reverse Osmosis for Maple Syrup Option 3

Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs, reviews one more reverse osmosis unit that is still applicable to the small-scale maple producer, despite this unit’s size.

2013 Maple Tubing Research

In 2013 a variety of spout and tubing cleaning and replacement options were tested to determine the extent of sap yield changes that would result. Most of these tests were done at the Cornell Arnot Research Forest.

Developing your Maple Marketing Plan for wholesale and bulk sales

The development of a marketing plan allows the maple producer to evaluate options to determine the most livable and profitable marketing options for selling my maple products in the wholesale and bulk market. The finished plan then allows the producer to focus efforts on what has been decided are the most livable and profitable ways of marketing for the business. For many maple producers who are most in love with maple production the question seems to be ÒNow that IÕve made maple syrup what is the best way for me to sell it?Ó The approach used in developing the marketing plan here is that of asking and evaluating some basic marketing questions will lead to assembling a reasona-ble marketing plan.

2012 Maple Tubing Research

In 2012 a variety of spout and tubing cleaning and replacement options were tested to determine the extent of sap yield changes. These tests were done at the Cornell Arnot Research Forest.

Calculating costs for a maple tubing system

An important part of beginning or improving the tubing system in a maple enterprise is to have a good estimate of just how much the project will cost. Though there are many variables in installing a new or replacing an old system the cost of materials is predictable. Two factors allow you to make a reasonable estimate of what a sap collection system will cost in materials. The first is the number of taps per acre. The second is the density of trees.

2011 Update of Maple Tubing and Taphole Sanitation Research at Cornell

During the 2011 maple sap season a variety of research trials were conducted at the Arnot Forest of Cornell University and in the woods of a number of cooperators both with vacuum and gravity systems. Research conducted over the last five years has shown that significant increases in sap yield can be obtained by keeping the tap hole from contamination by bacteria and yeast.

Beginning or Expanding Maple Syrup Operations as a Profitable Business!

The primary use for this guide is to assist maple operations in developing a basic plan used to secure funding for start-up, expansion, and operating loans as well as a basic framework to begin considering the income and expenses incurred as the operation develops.