Showing 1 – 10 of 18 resources

Forest Pests of North America

The purpose of this website is to provide images and information of insects, diseases, weeds, and abiotic factors that cause damage to urban, managed, and natural forests. This site aggregates pictures, publications, and tools from many sources and packages the resources in an easy, searchable format. This site is intended to be used by homeowners, land managers, volunteers, urban foresters, county agents, outreach educators, and anyone else interested in identifying and managing their trees and forests.

Spotted Lanternfly: A New Sugarbush Threat

A new foreign invader could have a substantially negative impact on the eastern North American hardwoods in general, and sugarbushes in particular. The Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula, SLF) was first detected near Philadelphia, PA in 2014 and since has spread throughout much of the Commonwealth and has been sighted in about a half dozen New York counties and in several sites in southern New England.

Ten Years with the Asian Longhorned Beetle Program in Massachusetts

ItÕs been 10 years since the ALB was first reported in Worcester, Massachusetts, and since then 24,179 ALB-infested trees have been found and removed, including the four trees mentioned. This has dramatically changed the character of the heaviest hit Worcester neighborhoods, Greendale and Burncoat, and resulted in a massive reforestation effort. Those neighborhoods were the center of the infestation and nearly every single host tree, including street trees, were removed in the effort to eradicate this pest. The DCR ALB Reforestation program, Worcester Tree Initiative, the city of Worcester, and the other five municipalities in the regulated area have replanted thousands of trees. Today, those young trees have become established and have started to provide much needed shade and wind breaks.

Asian Longhorned Beetle

This presentation by Tim Barwise (MA-DCR) the 2018 Vermont Maple Conferences covers the current infestation and the USDA-APHIS response to asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) in the greater Worcester, MA area.

Do Invasive Worms Threaten Northeast Maple Forests?

Some maple producers have reported low sugar maple regeneration that could be related to the presence of worms. This second wave of invasion by Asian earthworms is of concern to forest ecologists because of its potential disruption to the forest.

How to Identify and Control the Sugar Maple Borer

The sugar maple borer, Glycobius speciosus (Say), a long-horned wood boring beetle, is a common pest of sugar maple (the only known host) throughout the range of the tree. Although borer-caused mortality is rare, infestations lead to value loss through lumber defect caused by larval galleries, discoloration, decay, and twisted grain.

Is there Another Invasive Pest in your Sugarbush?

We found significant populations of snake worms devouring the organic matter, causing soil conditions that discouraged growth of understory native plant species. We are looking at their distribution in maple stands throughout the region relative to forest management practices, and assessing their impact on understory diversity, maple regeneration and various soil characteristics.

Asian Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), an Introduced Pest of Maple and Other Hardwood Trees in North America and Europe

The Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), threatens urban and forest hardwood trees both where introduced and in parts of its native range. Native to Asia, this beetle has hitchhiked several times in infested wood packaging used in international trade, and has established breeding populations in five U.S. states, Canada, and at least 11 countries in Europe. It has a broad host range for a cerambycid that attacks living trees, but in the introduced ranges it prefers maples. Identification, classification, and life history of this insect are reviewed here. Eradication is the goal where it has been introduced, which requires detection of infested trees using several approaches, including ground and tree-climbing surveys. Several agencies and researchers in the United States and Europe are evaluating the use of pheromone- and kairomone-baited traps. Control options beyond cutting down infested trees are limited.