Showing 11 – 18 of 18 resources

Asian Longhorned Beetle and its Host Trees

This pictorial guide provides basic information for identifying the Asian longhorned beetle, its injury characteristics, and its common host trees. The guide will help users detect the beetle in both urban and forested settings.

More invasive plants of the sugarbush

Identifying and removing invasive plants when they are few and small is the only way to keep from having a permanent infestation, one that will be a constant annoyance and expense.

Invaders in the sugarbush

Invasive exotic plants are becoming more prevalent and can have a negative impact on sugarbushes. Maple producers need to know how to identify and eradicate invasives.

Sugar Maple and the Pear Thrips

This tiny insect can cause major leaf “tatter” and flower damage on sugar maples and orchard trees, by feeding and laying eggs on the young leaves and flowers as the buds open in spring.

Some Background on the Asian Longhorned Beetle

The beetles were first discovered in Brooklyn, New York in 1996 and spread to neighboring Queens, infesting areas in Sunnyside, Woodside, Astoria, Long Island City, Maspeth, Ridgewood and later in Bayside and Flushing. Small infestations were also found in Flushing Meadows Park, Forest Park in Woodhaven and Kew Gardens Hills. New York city has lost over 4,000 trees because infested ones have to be cut down, chipped and burned.

Sugarmaker’s Guide to Pear Thrips Monitoring

Pear thrips surfaced as a new pest of sugar maple, Acer saccharum Marsh., in 1979. Damage from this insect occurs intermittently, and threatens the long-term health of maple trees throughout the northeastern United States and parts of Canada. A method for sampling forest soil to determine pear thrips populations is described that is suitable for sugarmakers. This method requires a minimum of equipment and time, and provides sugarmakers with a reliable estimate of the number of thrips in their sugar_bushes. By sampling and assessing damage annually, sugarmakers will gain an understanding of the relationship between thrips population levels and damage in their stands. Based on this information, potential damage in the spring can be estimated. Sample results are obtained before tapping so sugarmakers can adjust their management practices, such as the number of taps per tree, to minimize stress on trees when damage is likely.

Sugarbush Management: A Guide to Maintaining Tree Health

Many pests and other stresses affect maple trees growing in a sugarbush. Some pests can markedly reduce sap quantity; others, although conspicuous, are not important. Stresses can result from activities by people and from natural phenomena. Recognizing problems and understanding the factors that contribute to their occurrence, development, and significance are necessary to maintain tree health. This report brings together current information on the living agents and nonliving factors that can cause problems in sugarbushes. Insects, diseases, improper forest stand management, and unwise sugaring practices are illustrated. and ways to prevent or reduce their effects are described.