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Study Suggests Promising Ways to Market Maple

In 2020, the New York State Maple Producers’ Association, in cooperation with the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets, applied for and was awarded a USDA Acer Access and Development Program grant to conduct market research on the US consumer maple target audience. The project was designed to expand research, education, and extension efforts involving market sizing, audience research, and message testing, development, and planning to: 1) identify market opportunities, 2) optimize messaging, and 3) develop a market promotion and evaluation plan. The purpose of this work is to develop marketing tools and methods to increase the awareness of, and a rationale for, choosing pure maple syrup among audiences representing the greatest market opportunity. The program will achieve this goal through the development of research-driven messaging, market promotion strategies, and communications planning.

Invasive Insects of Eastern North American Sugarbushes

Invasive pests have been identified as one of the major threats to biodiversity worldwide. Many bodies, including the United Nations, recognize invasive species for the long-term detrimental impacts that they could have on our ecosystems. The most cost- and effort-saving way of dealing with invasive species is to prevent their initial spread into an area. This guide provides a brief summary of invasive insect pests threatening maple-producing regions of eastern Canada and the United States.

Maple Sports Drink

The Cornell Maple Program developed two athlete-approved recipes for a Tart Cherry and a Tangerine Maple Sports Drink. These beverages are designed to hydrate and replenish carbohydrates and electrolytes lost during physical activity. Because of the health-benefits (antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals), Maple Sports Drinks can be marketed as a functional beverage, a lucrative market projected to increase 7.8% from 2021 to 2028.

Mappleau Recipe

A recipe for making Mappleau, a maple-derived liqueur made from distilled maple wine and sweetened with pure maple syrup.

Maple Cream Troubleshooting

This article provides guidelines for addressing issues commonly encountered when making maple cream. Maple cream is a thick, smooth, spreadable confection derived from maple syrup. Its peanut butter-like texture develops when small sugar crystals are formed and held in a supersaturated or concentrated syrup solution. The consistency and quality are controlled by water content and inverted sugar levels.

Basics of Maple Marshmallows

The objective of this bulletin is to provide information on maple marshmallows for commercial production. This document includes an overview of marshmallow composition, a recipe, regulation requirements, information on packaging and food additives, market projections, and pricing information. Further, this article is the first in a subset of the “Marshmallow Series”, which also includes Dehydrating Maple Marshmallows, and Maple Marshmallow Spread.

A Summary of Regulations Governing Maple Syrup Production in Wisconsin

Pure Maple Syrup production in Wisconsin is regulated primarily by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP). This document assembles the various components of information to assist veteran and new producers of maple syrup in Wisconsin with the basic federal and state regulations impacting the maple syrup industry.

Sugarbush Management Videos

This collection of 13 videos from UVM Proctor Maple Research Center includes topics ranging from invasives to regeneration to culverts.

Quarter-Inch Tubing: Is it a Better Option for Gravity Sap Collection?

Ten years ago, 3/16” diameter tubing was introduced to the marketplace as an alternative tubing to 5/16” diameter tubing.  However, recent research shows that sap production in 3/16” tubing drops off as soon as the second year after installation due to microbial growth. A replacement for 3/16” diameter tubing in gravity systems could be 1/4” tubing. With almost twice the aperture of 3/16” tubing (0.049 sq inches compared to 0.0275 sq inches), 1/4″ inch tubing is less likely to plug from microbes yet is still able to create a full column of sap for gravity vacuum. Quarter-inch tubing is currently not available for maple producers but can be procured from other industries and, with modifications, will work for maple production.