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Comparison of the “Small” Spout with the Traditional 7/16″ Spout

The “small” spout, 19/64″ or 5/16″ in diameter, has been widely available to maple producers since the mid to late 1990’s as a “healthy” alternative to the traditional 7/16″ spout. While now in general use by producers in some regions, particularly those collecting sap by vacuum, the utility of these smaller spouts is still questioned by many sugarmakers, particularly those collecting sap by gravity. This article will review several studies conducted at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center comparing 7/16″ spouts with small spouts (for the purposes of this article, 5/16″, and 19/64″ will be considered equally as “small” spouts).

Sugar Profiles of Maple Syrup Grades

Although many analyses of the chemical composition of maple syrup have been conducted, relatively little information exists on the differences in composition of the individual syrup grades. As a first step in acquiring this information we performed a study to determine the characteristic sugar composition of each maple syrup grade.

Should Lateral Lines Be Vented?

A great deal has changed since the 1960s and 1970s in terms of maple production and recommended practices, especially given the introduction of the new polyethylene tubing formulations and new types of spouts. Consequently, we are occasionally asked whether lateral lines in gravity tubing installations should be vented. As a result of these questions, we compared sap yield from standard non vented (closed) 5/16″ lateral lines alongside a vented 5/16″ installation under gravity conditions.

Proctor Maple Research Center Update: Investigating the Effects of Sap Processing Equipment and Techniques on Maple Syrup Chemistry & Quality

A new research facility designed and dedicated to the study of the effects of sap processing equipment and techniques on the chemistry and quality of maple syrup is being constructed at the UVM Proctor Maple Research Center. This facility will allow researchers to evaluate the differences in maple syrup due to changes in sap processing equipment, including reverse osmosis, evaporators, and other evaporation equipment (steam-away, air injection units, etc.).

North American Maple Syrup Producers Manual

A must have for any serious producer. One of the best books out there that cover all aspects of maple. This book has chapters on History of Maple Syrup and Sugar Production, Maple Resource, Planning an Operation, Managing Maple Trees, Sap Production, Syrup Production, Syrup Filtration, Marketing and many more. With over 300 pages this book is full of wisdom.

Chemical Safety in Maple Sugaring Operations

This brochure is intended to raise awareness among sugarmakers about hazardous chemicals commonly being used in sugaring operations as well as the need to use these materials safely, in a way which protects personal and food product safety. This brochure will outline 1) the most common types of chemical hazards associated with sugarhouse chemicals, 2) basic guidelines for using chemicals safely, and 3) where to get more detailed information.

Fertilizing a Sugarbush

This brochure is intended to help landowners and maple producers evaluate the nutrition of maple stands, and determine whether fertilization might be appropriate. There is an emphasis on learning some of the plants in your woods, as these are often valuable indicators of site quality, and are in many cases easier to interpret than chemical analyses of soil or leaves.

Fertilization of Sugarbushes Part I: Physiological Effects

The goal of this project was to examine the effects of liming and fertilization on tree physiology, growth and sugar production of a moderately fertile maple stand. In this first report, we describe, in general terms, the study area, treatments, and results of liming and fertilization on tree physiology and growth.