Showing 21 – 30 of 36 resources

Results from the 2014 New England tapping survey

Results of an annual survey conducted of New England sugarmakers, capturing information on production practices and results, such as types of equipment used, sap sugar content, sanitation practices, and other data.

Crown Release Equals More and Sweeter Sap

Have you ever wondered why open grown trees produce more and sweeter sap than the ones growing close to each other? To answer these questions, I would like to share with you from my 37 years of experience in forest management.

Microbial Contamination in Maple Syrup

Occasionally, maple syrup becomes contaminated with floating masses or surface mold. Conventional practices have been to discard obvious mold growths, re-boil and then consume the syrup. This practice may be risky, especially with the increasing number of food borne illness outbreaks with other food products and the resulting negative publicity surrounding these outbreaks.

Energy Efficiency in the Sugarhouse

Boiling syrup is energy intensive, but there are ways for sugarmakers to calcuate and improve their energy use.

How Many Taps?

Tapping guidelines written by state regulators haven’t always kept pace with changes in industry practices or understanding of the science of sap flow, and researchers are working to update tapping guidelines.

Preventing mould in packed maple syrup

Preventing mould in packed maple syrup can be a challenge. Cold-packing syrup usually guarantees mould will grow in bottled containers and can impart off-flavour in the syrup. Maple researchers at the University of Maine and at Carleton University in Ontario are investigating whether current hot packing recommendations require refinement to preserve quality and prevent mould in syrup.

A model of the tapping zone

This article is intended to accompany the Tapping Zone Model available to download at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center (UVM-PMRC) website. It provides a general explanation of the model and how it can be used. The model can be used to estimate the chances of hitting conductive and nonconductive wood when tapping, and this can be used to assess the sustainability of current or planned tapping practices.