Showing 1 – 10 of 19 resources

Maple Sports Drink

The Cornell Maple Program developed two athlete-approved recipes for a Tart Cherry and a Tangerine Maple Sports Drink. These beverages are designed to hydrate and replenish carbohydrates and electrolytes lost during physical activity. Because of the health-benefits (antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals), Maple Sports Drinks can be marketed as a functional beverage, a lucrative market projected to increase 7.8% from 2021 to 2028.

Mappleau Recipe

A recipe for making Mappleau, a maple-derived liqueur made from distilled maple wine and sweetened with pure maple syrup.

Maple Cream Troubleshooting

This article provides guidelines for addressing issues commonly encountered when making maple cream. Maple cream is a thick, smooth, spreadable confection derived from maple syrup. Its peanut butter-like texture develops when small sugar crystals are formed and held in a supersaturated or concentrated syrup solution. The consistency and quality are controlled by water content and inverted sugar levels.

Basics of Maple Marshmallows

The objective of this bulletin is to provide information on maple marshmallows for commercial production. This document includes an overview of marshmallow composition, a recipe, regulation requirements, information on packaging and food additives, market projections, and pricing information. Further, this article is the first in a subset of the “Marshmallow Series”, which also includes Dehydrating Maple Marshmallows, and Maple Marshmallow Spread.

Mappleau: A Maple Liqueur

Mappleau (pronounced “mah-ploh”) is a maple-derived liqueur made from distilled maple wine and sweetened with pure maple syrup. Its manufacturing process and its namesake are inspired by Pommeau, a barrel-aged French liqueur made from fresh apple cider and apple brandy (hard cider that has been distilled). There are a few different production methods that achieve different flavor profiles. For oak-influence, the distilled maple wine, i.e., maple brandy, can be back sweetened with barrel-aged maple syrup, and/or the sweet Mappleau can be aged in various types of barrels (e.g., new oak, bourbon, wine, brandy, etc.). Alternatively, unoaked syrup can be used for back sweetening for a lighter flavor profile, and the Mappleau can be aged in a neutral vessel (e.g., stainless steel).

Measuring and Adjusting Invert Sugar in Maple Sugar

The variability of invert sugars in syrup makes it necessary to test and adjust the invert sugar levels to match the specific characteristics desired for a given confection. Testing syrup and adjusting to a proper invert sugar level can eliminate batch mfailures and help the maple producer make confections of consistent quality. For many years the use of the Clinitest tablets was suggested as the way to measure invert sugars in syrup. Now, a simple test using the common glucose meter used to monitor blood sugar can be very helpful in selecting and blending syrups to make the most consistent products. Testing syrups before they are purchased for the purpose of making confections assures you are getting syrup that will make the confections you want.