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2014 -15 Maple Tubing Research

In 2014 and 2015 the focus of the tubing and taphole sanitation research changed dramatically. Tests conducted in 2013 showed that if the spout and drop line were adequately sanitized sap yield comparable to a new spout and drop could be obtained. With the assistance of a grant from the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension program of the USDA and in cooperation with the Proctor Maple Research Center in Vermont, a variety of spout and drop cleaning and replacement options were tested to determine the extent of sap yield changes.

2015 3/16″ Maple Tubing Cooperator Trial

During the 2015 maple sap season the Cornell Maple Program conducted a small trial, testing sap yield from 5/16″ tubing vs. 3/16″ tubing. This trial was not conducted at the Arnot Research forest but with a small maple operation cooperator. The tubing system consisted of six lateral lines, three 5/16″ and three 3/16″ alternating between the two treatments across the hillside.

Advances in Understanding the Potential Health Benefits of Maple Syrup: The Path Forward

Over the past six years, my laboratory, and others, have been conducting research focused on identifying bioactive plant compounds (known as phytochemicals or phytonutrients) and evaluating the biological effects of maple syrup, maple water (i.e. maple sap), and maple plant parts and their derived extracts.

Are NASS Maple Surveys Underestimating Production?

Some have questioned the accuracy of NASS’s Maple Syrup estimates. The most common criticisms typically include: some producers don’t return their report, some don’t report accurately, and some don’t receive a report. I will address each one separately.

Asian Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), an Introduced Pest of Maple and Other Hardwood Trees in North America and Europe

The Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), threatens urban and forest hardwood trees both where introduced and in parts of its native range. Native to Asia, this beetle has hitchhiked several times in infested wood packaging used in international trade, and has established breeding populations in five U.S. states, Canada, and at least 11 countries in Europe. It has a broad host range for a cerambycid that attacks living trees, but in the introduced ranges it prefers maples. Identification, classification, and life history of this insect are reviewed here. Eradication is the goal where it has been introduced, which requires detection of infested trees using several approaches, including ground and tree-climbing surveys. Several agencies and researchers in the United States and Europe are evaluating the use of pheromone- and kairomone-baited traps. Control options beyond cutting down infested trees are limited.

Birch can help increase your maple operation profits

Birch syrup production uses the same equipment as maple syrup production, and the spring sapflow season begins just as the maple season is ending. Sugarmakers might want to consider adding birch production to their operations to generate additional revenue.

Birch can help increase your maple operation profits

Birch syrup production uses the same equipment as maple syrup production, and the spring sapflow season begins just as the maple season is ending. Sugarmakers might want to consider adding birch production to their operations to generate additional revenue.

Chemical composition of five standard grades of pure maple syrup

The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of the five maple syrup grades, including their pH, conductivity, mineral and carbohydrate contents. In general, quantification of the range of chemical composition for each standard maple syrup grade will strengthen the existing knowledge of maple syrup chemistry.

Choose wisely when selecting where to tap

Knowing when, where, and how to tap is critical to making good maple syrup and keeping trees healthy.