Showing 431 – 440 of all 538 resources in the database

Sugarbush Management: A Guide to Maintaining Tree Health

Many pests and other stresses affect maple trees growing in a sugarbush. Some pests can markedly reduce sap quantity; others, although conspicuous, are not important. Stresses can result from activities by people and from natural phenomena. Recognizing problems and understanding the factors that contribute to their occurrence, development, and significance are necessary to maintain tree health. This report brings together current information on the living agents and nonliving factors that can cause problems in sugarbushes. Insects, diseases, improper forest stand management, and unwise sugaring practices are illustrated. and ways to prevent or reduce their effects are described.

Sugarbush Mapping: Finding information to assist in forest management and planning in the sugarbush

Technological advances by maple equipment manufacturers, continued outreach and education by local, state, federal, and provincial maple organizations, and widespread adoption of new management practices by producers have revolutionized the maple industry over the last 20 years. The design and layout of sap collection systems and advances in vacuum pumps and releasers has resulted in higher per tap sap yields well beyond the old standards. Increased per tap volume has been matched with modern high brix reverse osmosis systems and efficiency gains in evaporators, pushing the economic potential of making maple syrup to new heights. Value-added products, niche marketing and branding, and social media and online platforms, coupled with health conscious and savvy consumers,have altered the retail sales landscape and linked rural maple producers to consumers around the world.

Sugarbush Mapping: What’s in your woods? Measuring density

Looking around your woods you’ll see that there are far more trees on the landscape than you have time to measure. The science of forestry has taught us that similar stands (ones that have the same species composition, size classes, productivity, and management history) do not need to undergo a 100% census to get an accurate picture of what is there. Foresters use sampling methods that inventory stands to get an accurate representation of what is in them and the quality of the resource.

Sugarbush roots

The root systems of our trees are rather mysterious, and somewhat fragile. It pays to take precautions to protect the part of the tree that is not visible, just as we protect the rest of the tree that we can see.

Sugarbush roots

The root systems of our trees are rather mysterious, and somewhat fragile. It pays to take precautions to protect the part of the tree that is not visible, just as we protect the rest of the tree that we can see.

Sugarhouse Aesthetics: What The Public Sees

Some producers are willing to open up their sugarhouse doors to show the buying public how we make the sweet treat. Repeat customers know the quality of product produced, but for many consumers the operation’s aesthetics are critical to their purchasing habits.

Sugarhouse Design

A guide to designing and constructing an efficient sugarhouse.

Sugaring in the Fall

Sap can be collected and syrup produced in the fall, but sugar content is low and the practice raises additional challenges for the spring crop.

Sugaring in the Fall

Sap can be collected and syrup produced in the fall, but sugar content is low and the practice raises additional challenges for the spring crop.