Showing 591 – 600 of all 604 resources in the database

What’s trending

The 2012 USDA Census of Agriculture reveals trends in growth for number of producers and number of taps in many states.

When do I Tap a Maple Tree?

University of Maine Cooperative Extension educator Kathy Hopkins discusses the best time of year to tap maple trees in Maine.

When is it Syrup? Tools and techniques for measuring syrup density

One of the most important skills for sugarmakers to master is knowing when what’s boiling in the evaporator has become syrup. Quality control is key, and packaging syrup too dense or not dense enough will ruin the best of any sugarmaker’s efforts.

When is it Syrup? Tools and techniques for measuring syrup density

One of the most important skills for sugarmakers to master is knowing when what’s boiling in the evaporator has become syrup. This guide to mesuring density explains the tools and techniques for accurate measurement.

When to Stop: Some Factors Affecting The Economics of Processing Grade Syrup

Near the end of each sugaring season, producers must make a decision when to stop making maple syrup. Sometimes the decision is an easy call, such as when the onset of bud break and cessation of sap flow coincide. The decision to stop production can also be the result of careful economic analysis of the cost of production versus value of the product. The variable costs (fuel, labor, filters, etc.) of any maple operation are a key component to this sort of analysis.

When Tubing is Tapped Out: Recycling Maple Plastics

As the maple industry has grown, so too has the use of plastic sap tubing. Solutions are needed to help producers dispose of tubing when it is past its useful life, in ways that ensure it is not merely ending up in landfills.

Which side of the tree should you tap?

Thoughts and data on how setting taps on different aspects of a tree can impact sap yield.

Why change the maple grading system?

Thoughts on the value of implementing the new maple grading system.

Why do some maple trees produce more sap?

Many researchers, in addition to many sugarmakers, have observed that there is a great range in the amount of sap produced from individual trees in a forest. Understanding, and perhaps predicting the different performances of the trees in a sugarbush is an aspect of maple physiology that remains fascinating.

Why sap may not always flow well in early season

Maple producers know that when the temperature starts to rise in the spring, sap flows can’t be far behind. But when the weather starts to warm early in the spring and temperatures seem favorable for good sap flows, they are sometimes left wondering why the sap hasn’t started to run. There are several explanations for the disconnect between warm air temperature and a lack of flow during
the early season.