Showing 51 – 60 of 76 resources

How often should you replace droplines?

Many studies have demonstrated the benefits of replacing droplines on sap yields. The research outlined in this article outlines several replacement strategies to allow producers to determine the cost-effectiveness of each.

Remaking Maple

Overview of new method of gathering sap from sugar maple saplings.

2012 Maple Tubing Research

In 2012 a variety of spout and tubing cleaning and replacement options were tested to determine the extent of sap yield changes. These tests were done at the Cornell Arnot Research Forest.

Tubing Cleaning – Methods Used in the U.S.

A wide variety of cleaning techniques are currently used in the maple industry, including rinsing the system with pressurized air and water, or attempts to sanitize with chemical solutions such as peroxide, bleach, or alcohol. However, the effectiveness of these cleaning techniques in reducing microbial populations and increasing annual sap yield is often questionable.

Calculating costs for a maple tubing system

An important part of beginning or improving the tubing system in a maple enterprise is to have a good estimate of just how much the project will cost. Though there are many variables in installing a new or replacing an old system the cost of materials is predictable. Two factors allow you to make a reasonable estimate of what a sap collection system will cost in materials. The first is the number of taps per acre. The second is the density of trees.

High Vacuum in Gravity Tubing

Gravity tubing systems are widely used in many small to mid-sized operations throughout the maple region. This article summarizes the past 3 years of my research on gravity tubing, or tubing without a vacuum pump.

2011 Update of Maple Tubing and Taphole Sanitation Research at Cornell

During the 2011 maple sap season a variety of research trials were conducted at the Arnot Forest of Cornell University and in the woods of a number of cooperators both with vacuum and gravity systems. Research conducted over the last five years has shown that significant increases in sap yield can be obtained by keeping the tap hole from contamination by bacteria and yeast.