Showing 61 – 70 of 76 resources

Antimicrobial Silver in Maple Sap Collection

Because of a new approach to using nano-silver, the fact that PFA has been banned, and the desire to control microorganisms in maple sap collection systems, the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center investigated the use of spouts and tubing containing antimicrobial nano-silver for suitability for increasing maple sap yield.

Salvaging your Sap: Checking Vacuum Lines for Leaks

A vacuum pump attached to a well-designed tubing system will significantly boost sap flow compared to gravity sap collection, by increasing the difference in pressure between the tree, the source of the sap, and the tubing, where we want the sap to flow. A vacuum pump, however, will not deliver much, if any, vacuum to the trees if the tubing system is not tight and leak-free. This article gives basic instructions on how to check for those leaks, and how to fix them.

Vacuum Sap Collection: How High or Low Should You Go?

Questions of how vacuum affects maple sap, syrup and trees have existed for many years, and these issues are perhaps more important today than ever before due to the increasing use of collection systems that can achieve very high levels of vacuum. This article will describe recent research performed at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center that was designed to answer questions about high vacuum.

Should Lateral Lines Be Vented?

A great deal has changed since the 1960s and 1970s in terms of maple production and recommended practices, especially given the introduction of the new polyethylene tubing formulations and new types of spouts. Consequently, we are occasionally asked whether lateral lines in gravity tubing installations should be vented. As a result of these questions, we compared sap yield from standard non vented (closed) 5/16″ lateral lines alongside a vented 5/16″ installation under gravity conditions.

Controlling Microbial Population in Sap Systems

Over the course of one maple sap season in Western New York that started approximately March 8, 2005 and ended April 9, 2005, four maple sap locations were sampled to determine the levels and diversity of microbial populations contained in the different sap samples.

A History of the Gooseneck: The Brower Sap Piping System and the Cary Maple Sugar Company

The initial application of plastic tubing for gathering maple sap in the 1950s was indisputably one of the most significant technological developments of the maple industry in the twentieth century. However, the first viable tubing system was introduced over forty years earlier as a gravity drawn system made completely of metal.

Evaluation of Alternative Sap Ladders: Summary of 2002-2003 Research Project

This research project was established in the spring of 2002 to study the technique of lifting sap with simple “sap ladder” tubing structures. It was conducted during the production seasons of 2002 and 2003 in an operational setting at Wheelers Maple Products in Lanark County, Ontario.

Two Pipe Sap Ladder – A Promising Alternative

A two pipe sap ladder consists of a structure of two vertical pipes connecting the lower and upper sections of mainline. It was initially thought that the sap would lift in the pipe on the vacuum side and that air would travel through the pipe on the bush side. Results were not as expected.