Showing 341 – 347 of all 347 resources in the database

What’s trending

The 2012 USDA Census of Agriculture reveals trends in growth for number of producers and number of taps in many states.

When is it Syrup? Tools and techniques for measuring syrup density

One of the most important skills for sugarmakers to master is knowing when what’s boiling in the evaporator has become syrup. Quality control is key, and packaging syrup too dense or not dense enough will ruin the best of any sugarmaker’s efforts.

When is it Syrup? Tools and techniques for measuring syrup density

One of the most important skills for sugarmakers to master is knowing when what’s boiling in the evaporator has become syrup. This guide to mesuring density explains the tools and techniques for accurate measurement.

When to Stop: Some Factors Affecting The Economics of Processing Grade Syrup

Near the end of each sugaring season, producers must make a decision when to stop making maple syrup. Sometimes the decision is an easy call, such as when the onset of bud break and cessation of sap flow coincide. The decision to stop production can also be the result of careful economic analysis of the cost of production versus value of the product. The variable costs (fuel, labor, filters, etc.) of any maple operation are a key component to this sort of analysis.

Which side of the tree should you tap?

Thoughts and data on how setting taps on different aspects of a tree can impact sap yield.

Why change the maple grading system?

Thoughts on the value of implementing the new maple grading system.

Why do some maple trees produce more sap?

Many researchers, in addition to many sugarmakers, have observed that there is a great range in the amount of sap produced from individual trees in a forest. Understanding, and perhaps predicting the different performances of the trees in a sugarbush is an aspect of maple physiology that remains fascinating.